event.preventDefault() vs. return false

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When I want to prevent other event handlers from executing after a certain event is fired, I can use one of two techniques. I’ll use jQuery in the examples, but this applies to plain-JS as well:

1. event.preventDefault()

$('a').click(function (e) {
    // custom handling here
    e.preventDefault();
});

2. return false

$('a').click(function () {
    // custom handling here
    return false;
});

Is there any significant difference between those two methods of stopping event propagation?

For me, return false; is simpler, shorter and probably less error prone than executing a method. With the method, you have to remember about correct casing, parenthesis, etc.

Also, I have to define the first parameter in callback to be able to call the method. Perhaps, there are some reasons why I should avoid doing it like this and use preventDefault instead? What’s the better way?

First answer

return false from within a jQuery event handler is effectively the same as calling both e.preventDefault and e.stopPropagation on the passed jQuery.Event object.

e.preventDefault() will prevent the default event from occuring, e.stopPropagation() will prevent the event from bubbling up and return false will do both. Note that this behaviour differs from normal (non-jQuery) event handlers, in which, notably, return false does not stop the event from bubbling up.

Source: John Resig

Any benefit to using event.preventDefault() over “return false” to cancel out an href click?

Second answer

This is not, as you’ve titled it, a “JavaScript” question; it is a question regarding the design of jQuery.

jQuery and the previously linked citation from John Resig (in karim79’s message) seem to be the source misunderstanding of how event handlers in general work.

Fact: An event handler that returns false prevents the default action for that event. It does not stop the event propagation. Event handlers have always worked this way, since the old days of Netscape Navigator.

The documentation from MDN explains how return false in an event handler works

What happens in jQuery is not the same as what happens with event handlers. DOM event listeners and MSIE “attached” events are a different matter altogether.

For further reading, see attachEvent on MSDN and the W3C DOM 2 Events documentation.

Third answer

Generally, your first option (preventDefault()) is the one to take, but you have to know what context you’re in and what your goals are.

Fuel Your Coding has a great article on return false; vs event.preventDefault() vs event.stopPropagation() vs event.stopImmediatePropagation().

Reprint:https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1357118/event-preventdefault-vs-return-false
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